Writing takes work but it’s worth it!

When I was 16, having read Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings for the fourth time, I tried my hand at writing fantasy. A dismal failure. Way too derivative. I gave up, except for one university assignment where I successfully told the Beowulf story from the queen’s perspective.

 

For the next few years, I wrote a little poetry and got busy in community development work. Then, I got a job where I had to tell two stories every week. I needed to delve into old myths and let them shine light on modern everyday questions. This was really good practice (I work as a protestant minister.)

 

So about ten years ago, when the itch to write fantasy could no longer be resisted, I delved into the myths of Greece. I immersed myself in that world and began to tell the story of a girl who meets a centaur. Eventually I enrolled in a correspondence program in creative writing and learned how little I knew about setting a scene and narrative arc.  I revised and revised and revised. Learned a lot! That story waits in a drawer for rebirth one of these days. But I had the bug, and a bit more of the knack. I picked up another theme, the captive princess/ Helen of Troy story. Once more I plunged into the world when the gods of Olympus were young. The novel released on Wednesday, Moon of the Goddess, came to be.

 

This novel required two research trips to Greece, a wonderful side benefit to the choice of setting! And it took lots of revision, and some patient, helpful readers. But I enjoyed the project from start to finish. I hope you do too! (It is available as an ebook right now from Prizm Books, Amazon and Barnes and Noble.)

 

So, if you dream of writing, or whatever, don’t give up! The princess in Moon of the Goddess didn’t. I didn’t. Keep at it and amazing things can happen. 

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About cathyhird

I am an author, a farmer, a minister, and when I get a chance, a weaver. Storytelling that inspires is important to me. I have two novels set in ancient Greece, Moon of the Goddess and Before the New Moon Rises.
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